Trade Shows Value

As the record number of registrations for next week’s Montreal Wood Convention attests, trade shows are not going away. That’s the conclusion also expressed in an informative post by Tom Oakes in the blog archives at Astro Exhibitions. And we agree. It’s true that in this digital age, that offers 24/7 connection, there is a re-examination of the relevance or value of trade shows and exhibitions.

Top four interesting facts that Oakes points out:

1. Lead generation is the top reason to attend a trade show. Almost 70% of trade show attendees offer new prospects or leads for exhibitors.
2. 75% of trade show attendees travel over 400 miles to attend a show, highlighting the potential international audience you can reach by attending the right trade show.
3. The number one reason people visit an exhibition is to see new products. 92% of all attendees to exhibitions say that their primary reason is to find new products and it has been the same for the last 25 years. This demonstrates the value of an exhibition for introducing your products and services to a potential new audience.
4. Almost 100% of marketers surveyed by the CEIR (Centre of Exhibition Industry Research) said they felt that exhibitions offered unique value not offered from other marketing mediums.

Leaving aside the research and the numbers there is one factor above all else that keeps trade shows relevant. Human interaction. We are in an ever-increasing world of technological advancement and there are more ways than ever to connect with people but one thing that is not going out of fashion anytime soon is the power of making a face-to-face connection. Humans by our very nature are social beings, we crave interaction. We react and interact with body language, able to subconsciously detect the slightest change and inflection in someone’s manner and demeanour. Technology will always struggle to replicate this experience. Trade shows and exhibitions offer the perfect environment to create and nurture business relationships based on the simplest of interpersonal skills.
– Tom Oakes, Astro Exhibitions

Alternative Facts?

Revised data that corrects a “massive” disparity in Canadian softwood lumber shipment volumes to the United States in 2016 could significantly impact countervailing and/or anti-dumping duty cases. According to Random Lengths, statistics gathered through the U.S. Census Bureau had reported that imports from Canada were 16.065 billion board feet in 2016. Figures from Statistics Canada indicated Canadian shipments to the U.S. were 14.954 billion board feet. “The gap between the two sets of data of 1.11 bbf, or 7%, was massive by historical standards. The discrepancy surfaced late in the first quarter last year, and grew as wide as 10%” (Random Lengths International Report, March 15). We’re told a number of downward adjustments released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau which included SPF, Western Red Cedar, and Douglas Fir shipments, brings the U.S. import statistics in accord with Canadian export data.

Northwestern EXPO

“Tune in!” shouted Mike Foley, Certified Speaking Professional and founder of Clarity Central, keynote speaker yesterday at the Northwestern Building Products EXPO in Bloomington, Minnesota. That’s how Mike suggests we differentiate ourselves in a world where everyone is distracted, overwhelmed, overworked – and no one is present. “Tune in to your kid, your boss, your partner, your customer,” said Mike, while noting the attention span of a millennial (8 seconds) is shorter than the attention span of a goldfish (9 seconds).

In his breakfast presentation, Mike expanded on his four keys to “letting go” and “losing the junk in our trunk”: grow your comfort zone, find your balance, manage your mind, lighten your load. It was a fast-paced workshop. One memorable round table exercise quickly revealed how growth can only occur outside the comfort zone, in “the stress zone”. How to manage your mind? “Become a fine connoisseur of the present moment! Where do you live? In the past, present, or future? How does this affect your life? How would it change if you lived moment to moment?” His segment on the importance of credibility and balance – “responding skillfully” – was perhaps most relevant to many attendees engaged in lumber trading.

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Market Minute

While Dakeryn has been an associate member of the Northwestern Lumber Association for a number of years, this was our first time attending and exhibiting at the Northwestern Building Products EXPO. Held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Bloomington, MN, the show was tight and upbeat. Virtually every key US distributor in the region was represented. Most retail dealers in attendance acknowledged that business was ticking along – unseasonably steady for January. While the show’s slogan was A World of Opportunities, the majority of Midwest lumber dealers we spoke with openly expressed apprehension over looming cross-border trade constraints. Most-asked question: “What’s going to happen?”

Softwood Talk, or not.

According to weekend reports, the US International Trade Commission determined Friday there is indication of injury from imports of softwood lumber products from Canada. Perhaps the market is sensing that a resolution will ultimately be found in a negotiated, managed trade agreement, but probably not before duties are in place. By May? In the face of the looming threat of retroactive duties, cross-border shipments continue largely unabated as mills and distributors weigh decisions impacting trading activity into February.

Meanwhile, Random Lengths reports word of “sizable inventories in US reloads”. No doubt we’ll soon find out if this is the case. If history is any guide, building mountains of inventory in advance of duties/export taxes/quota is anything but a speculative “no-brainer”. We’ve all seen the movie. Still, dealer demand for lumber in the United States, albeit hand-to-mouth – has been surprisingly buoyant so far this winter. Certainly some items are in abundant supply – on both sides of the border. But in this uncertain environment, over time, it seems any items in tight supply today would become even scarcer when Canadian shipments are eventually constrained.

Meanwhile, the US Department of Commerce investigations continue; the countervailing duty determination is expected February 20, while the preliminary antidumping duty determination is expected May 4.

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Memorial South Park, Vancouver – New Year’s Day

 

~Musical Refreshment~

Q&A – 2016 Edition

Of the Top Ten Questions for 2016 posed at Harderblog one year ago, the first five have been satisfactorily answered for us:

1. Will the Trump presidential campaign have staying power beyond March?
See November election results.

2. Will the US make history by electing a woman as president for the first time?
No.

3. Will BC softwood log exports to Mainland China eclipse BC softwood lumber exports?
For the answer to this question, we turned to Russ Taylor, President, WOOD MARKETS. “Interesting question, but lumber export volumes to China have always been much higher than logs. The gap is narrowing, but lumber export volumes are still much higher.” Russ confirms BC softwood exports to China through October as follows: Logs = 3.0 million m3 vs 2.43 million m3 in 2015 (+23%); Lumber = 5.0 million m3 vs 5.49 million m3 in 2015 (-9%). Of course, log exports even south of the border continue to be a contentious issue.

exports

4. Will a new Softwood Lumber Agreement be reached between Canada and the United States before the standstill period ends October 13?
No. By early October, we were told talks had entered the days of magical thinking. And while the US Lumber Coalition’s submission of their petition to the US Department of Commerce was predictable, the November 25 timing caught markets by surprise. At least one forest analyst suggested “it put a whole new spin on Black Friday.”

5. Is this the year virtual reality goes mainstream?
As the cost of development falls, we’re told virtual reality is in fact beginning to move into the mainstream. However, it’s reported that most console headsets are still “device-exclusive”. And flaws in these controllers actually tempered demand in 2016, leading Tech Digest to ask will virtual reality finally become mainstream in 2017?

Economy Grade

When referencing “Economy” in relation to lumber, we’re talking falldown or lower grade. That’s not to say there can’t be value in economy grade. A whole industry of utilizing lower grades finds economic viability around remanufacturing lower grades of wood. At the same time, bottom-line, results-driven users of lumber are recognizing benefits of enhanced value in quality in planning construction inventory needs. It’s understandable that suppliers concerned with building brand recognition around quality, both in terms of service and product, tend not to build that awareness around ‘economy’.

In the airlines industry, ‘economy’ defines a supposed base line of minimum, acceptable service. Or so we thought. But not so much anymore. In an effort to redefine coach by re-grading passengers, it’s reported here a number of airlines are introducing a section with even fewer perks than economy class. The “deprivations” United passengers will be experiencing with implementation of “basic economy” suggest levels of service that will not allow for any overhead bin space – and declaration for boarding last. Presumably everybody still lands at the same time.

This trend is interesting considering the inferior quality of products and service being promoted seems to be ‘flying’ in the face of other aspects of commercial/industrial/consumer trends. In this age of heightened branding awareness, the airline approach seems to be contradictory to what their branding goals purport to represent. In the lumber business, “adding value” has built-in connotation for upgrade of quality in product and service, not a dumbing down of those variables. In fact, in the event of a new hybrid tax and quota softwood lumber agreement, some suggest that ‘economy’ could be the first to go.. on a slow boat to China.

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From NLGA, Standard Grading Rules for Canadian Lumber

Autumn Winds

Elizabeth Browning’s poem The Autumn refers to this time of year “Where waving woods and waters wild  Do hymn an autumn sound.” For many of us, this year’s first sounds of fall bring an unusual mix of seasonal notes:

Amid Maritime vacation memories not yet fully unpacked come reviews of first day of kindergarten for my four-year-old, a tumble and fall off the bus on day one of Grade One for my six-year-old, and newspaper reports suggesting the provincial government could seek exemptions from export duties for B.C. re-manufacturers that might come in a new Softwood Lumber Agreement with the U.S.
Ensuring access to timber for the value-added sector poses ongoing challenge. It is hoped the proposed exemption would provide incentive for big timber licensees to make more wood available to the value-added segment of the forest industry. Meanwhile, a report today from CIBC Capital Markets cites a source via Inside U.S. Trade who suggested SLA negotiations were closer at the 100-day period than they are now. 

It seems the “chilling autumn winds” that Browning talked about could deliver more than a bloody lip that highlighted my daughter’s Grade One debut. Amid election-fueled talk of softwood negotiations, lumber traders are bracing for the October 12th standstill expiry to deliver more tears than exemptions.

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Lunchtime! with Grandad – Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia (30 Aug 2016)