Picking the Perfect Christmas Tree

Whoever said it was easy? Picking out the ‘right’ Christmas tree, that is. Traditionally, when I was growing up it usually came down to whether or not Mom agreed with the selection. In fact one now-retired lumber wholesaler (who shall go unnamed) in years past was known to have once even returned the carefully selected family tree to the lot, because it failed to pass re-inspection upon delivery at home.

Some tips on picking the right tree from Reader’s Digest are worth noting here. Good Housekeeping meanwhile, leans toward the green variety: “Most Christmas trees are now raised on established farms, meaning deforestation isn’t an issue, but they must be shipped, often from long distances. They do require pesticides and fueled vehicles to maintain, and may end up taking up space in landfills. Most artificial Christmas trees are made in China, typically from oil-derived, pollution-releasing polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A number have been found to contain lead. Once finally disposed of, artificial trees will last for centuries in landfills. These days, roughly 70% of Americans choose artificial.”

Here in Vancouver, it was shocking to discover that real trees are illegal in many downtown condo buildings. Just this week, some nervous tenants were seen smuggling very suspicious-looking large garbage bagged shapes with the unmistakable aroma of fresh green Fir.

“Never worry about the size of your Christmas tree. In the eyes of children, they are all 30 feet tall.”
– Larry Wilde

photo-001

A fine Fraser Fir stands ready..

Leave a Reply